Connect with us at Construction Intel Summit KSA on 23 Nov 2022 | Live | Riyadh

Connect with us at Construction Intel Summit KSA on 23 Nov 2022 | Live | Riyadh

Automation Strategy & Management

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01.

Productive

You can generate and share results without waiting to reach some faraway “finish line.”In other words, incremental automation is good. It’s the “automate first, ask questions later” (or never) approach that tends to exacerbate underlying issues.

02.

Flexible

You can review and revise priorities as conditions change.In other words, incremental automation is good. It’s the “automate first, ask questions later” (or never) approach that tends to exacerbate underlying issues.

03.

Attainable

Your team can actually execute the strategy – a wildly underrated characteristic when setting even the most ambitious goals.In other words, incremental automation is good. It’s the “automate first, ask questions later” (or never) approach that tends to exacerbate underlying issues.

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Productive

You can generate and share results without waiting to reach some faraway “finish line.”In other words, incremental automation is good. It’s the “automate first, ask questions later” (or never) approach that tends to exacerbate underlying issues.

Quick and Accurate

You can review and revise priorities as conditions change.In other words, incremental automation is good. It’s the “automate first, ask questions later” (or never) approach that tends to exacerbate underlying issues.

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Attainable

Your team can actually execute the strategy – a wildly underrated characteristic when setting even the most ambitious goals.In other words, incremental automation is good. It’s the “automate first, ask questions later” (or never) approach that tends to exacerbate underlying issues.

Identify The Starting Point

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So-called “boil the ocean” strategies offer an attractive cop-out: No one has to decide where to begin if you’re going to try to do everything all at once. (Needless to say, that strategy comes with its own problems.)

Here’s a good rule of thumb: Use boring, annoying, or downright painful work as a guide when prioritizing automation areas, especially early in your strategic initiative. (This is essentially what your sysadmins and other IT pros have been doing on their own, by the way.)

This isn’t limited to IT, as we wrote recently: You can find automation candidates in virtually every department. Does someone have to manually enter the same data into multiple systems to complete a single task? That sounds like a starting point.

Link Automation With Broader Business Goals

Ad hoc automation tends to occur independently of other efforts. Even if it solves a problem at hand, there are unclear (if any) links to how that aligns with broader goals.

While that might be fine to some extent, it can also breed silos, cultural resistance, and other potential issues. Strategic automation can be both incremental and well-connected to the big picture.

While there are many questions a CIO will have along the way when deciding their automation strategy, the single most important question they should ask themselves is: ‘How will automation help my organization achieve the business outcomes we need to get to where we want to be in 4-5 years?’” Becky Trevino, VP of operations at Snow Software told us.

Automation is such a broad category that it can be tough for people to wrap their heads around in a practical manner. Outcome- or goal-oriented automation strategy can be a big help.

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Equate Automation With Improvement

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Your strategy should not simply ask “where can we automate?” but “where can we improve?” Automating something just because you can is fine from a learning and experimentation standpoint, but not as useful from a goals and results standpoint.

If you can’t answer questions like “how does this help people?” or “how does this make us better?” then you should ask a different question: “Why are we doing this?” A clear focus on improvement – not just to the bottom line, but to people’s jobs – is by definition results-oriented.

If automation simply replaces one tedious process with another, then it’s likely to fail,

The best automation approaches make existing employees feel like they’ve been given a superpower,” Kadous says. “They’re like, ‘Wow! I can do so much cool stuff now!’ You can then rely on word of mouth for usage to spread. If it spreads organically, that’s a very good sign.